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IF THIS WERE TO HAPPEN ON YOUR INSTALLATION......

 
Photo: IF THIS WERE TO HAPPEN ON YOUR INSTALLATION HOW WOULD YOU RESPOND? ARE YOUR PEOPLE PREPARED? ARE YOU? IS THERE A PLAN IN PLACE TO DEAL WITH STUFF LIKE THIS? IS THE PLAN LOCKED UP SOMEWHERE IN SOME BOSS' OFFICE OR WORKED, PRACTICED, ADJUSTED AND WORKED AGAIN?

Sometimes you only get the one chance to prepare for tomorrow. Don't be caught napping. Stay safe.If this were to happen on your installation how would you react or respond? Would you know what to do? Are your people prepared to do what has to be done? Is there a plan in place to deal with stuff like this?
 
Has the plan ever been tested, worked or it is locked up in the boss' office to show who  the Top Cat is? Or it is widely publicized for the workforce's clear and unambiguous understanding and effective practical interpretation?
 
Does anyone know for sure what the plan says and who's got what and what role in any type of situation? What are the goals of the plan?
 
When last was it updated to reflect current installation status or take into account recent hardware or procedural changes?
 
Who's the focal point or custodian,whose job it is to maintain the Plan in a state of currency? Now is everyone confident they can do what's expected of them correctly and in time in an emergency?
 
Who has been trained? Who has not been trained? For assigned roles and responsibility, who leads and who follows when there's a melt down? What does the odd visitor of the day do? Who accounts for him/her and who mentors him/her for the duration of stay?
 
Do Emergency Response (ER) Equipment work as designed and expected? Have they ever been altered, modified to smoothen over issues of non-availability of spares, replacement parts or equipment change out? Who's aware of such adhoc changes or modifications? Are they of the Approved types or sub Spec? Is there a plan of maintenance for these equipment or not?
 
Is there a service and status log or some other type of record? Where is such record kept or held? Who presides over testing and replenishment as it affects dischargeable portable or handheld lifesaving equipment and other fixtures?
 
These are some crucial questions that investors and other stakeholders must ask themselves from time to time, well ahead of any so-called accident. There's no point in thinking it will never happen to you or your installation.
 
You see, sometimes, you only get the one chance to prepare for tomorrow. Don't be caught napping. A lot may depend n it.
 
Note: Photo culled from the www.

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